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Introducing Citrus Australia

Sweet. Safe. Healthy. These are the three words that best describe Australian Oranges.

Sweet. Really sweet tasting oranges and mandarins. I don't usually like oranges because most tend to be sour (hello Vitamin C) but these are really sweet. No kidding.




Safe. The orange and mandarins are grown on farms that promotes natural care (uses natural fertilizers, etc) and applies the Integrated Pest Management (IPM) technology. and are mostly grown in unpolluted regions in Australia. IPM are based on achieving a careful balance of pests (bad insects) and beneficials (good insects). The good insects destroys the bad insects so this natural way of pest control is far better than using agrichemical spray.

Healthy. Oranges contain a wide variety of nutrients and is considered all around the world as an important source of Vitamin C. It is also rich in Vitamin A, flavanoids, antioxidants, potassium, calcium, magnesium and dietary fiber.

Anthony Weymouth, Senior Trade Commissioner, Australian Trade Commission in Manila

Citrus in Australia is grown in almost grown in every part of the mainland except in Tasmania where the climate is not suitable for growing oranges. The oranges are grown mostly in the southern region: Riverland in South Australia, Murray Valley in Victoria, and New South Wales and Riverina in New South Wales. 

Meanwhile, Mandarins are mostly grown in Queensland in the Central Burnett and Emerald districts but there are now mandarin farms in Riverland and Murray Valley.

The farms usually ranges from 40 to 100 hectares in size although there are some that are more than 500 and the biggest farm is 1,600 hectares. Farms are mostly family owned but some are owned by corporations also. 

Andrew Harty, General Manager/ Market Development, Citrus Australia Ltd. 

Australian Citrus was presented to the media (both print and online) last July 31, 2014 with a short presscon at the Residence of the Australian Ambassador to the Philippines, Mr. Bill Twedell.

David Daniels, Market Access Manager, Citrus Australia Ltd. 

Australian Citrus (oranges, mandarin) will be available in local groceries and supermarkets soon. This is in response to the growing market of health-conscious consumers in the Philippines and will be offered at a very competitive price so that more Filipinos consumers will enjoy its Sweet-Safe-Healthy benefits. 



Anthony Weymouth, David Daniels, Ambassador Bill Twedell, and Andrew Harty









Cocktails were served after the launch and the dishes highlighted Australian Citrus by incorporating the oranges and mandarins in the dishes and desserts.

For recipes and cocktails with oranges and mandarins, please visit this link

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