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Tilapia Is Bad For The Health

Years ago, galunggong was the poor man's fish, nowadays, its tilapia. Tilapia dishes are also included in most restaurants now so almost everyone knows what it is. Its as popular as the bangus and I think most kids eats tilapia compared to bangus unless its boneless bangus.

Although I am not that overly fond of tilapia, I do cook it for my family since you can buy it fresh (alive) from the market and is always available even in supermarkets.

However, upon reading the article --- Eating Tilapia Is Worse Than Eating Bacon ... I began to have some doubts about this fish.

1. It says in the article that "tilapia may worsen inflammation which can lead to heart disease, arthritis, asthma, and a world of other serious health problems."

2. "Contains cancer causing pollutants." This, I believe is true since farmed fish- like chickens, are being fed chemically enhanced pellets to grow fast and multiply.

3. And "to keep them alive, farm owners give antibiotics to the fish to stave off disease."

Hmmmm ... so what fish do I buy now? Luckily, hubby and daughter prefers gindara, tanigue, tuna and the occasional salmon. We also love lapu-lapu but after being sold a fake one (formalin laden, I think) two years ago, we scraped it off our list.



Comments

  1. OMG.. I love it pa naman. T_T thanks for this sis,

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think safe naman to eat tilapia as long as in moderation. After all, wala na tayong kakainin. Besides, most food being sold today belongs to the "chemically enhanced" food group. The word "organic" is almost abused. :)

      Delete
  2. Anonymous7:41 PM

    aaaw.. :( we love tilapia. thank you sis for the info! :)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Anonymous10:53 AM

    This is one of the few fishes I eat. :| Oh well, at least it's not served frequently at home, I could still enjoy it then.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Read about this and wasn't sure how I should feel about it. I feel like everything's farm-bred now, so parang wala na tayong choice?

    Abi
    http://thebelatedbloomer.blogspot.com
    twitter and instagram: @BelatedBloomer

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There's still bangus although knowing that its being "farmed" also e malamang same pellets din like tilapia.. oh wells, wala na nga tayo choice kainin :(

      Delete
  5. Yes. Now I have an excuse to tell my parents to quit buying tilapia and just stick to dory and salmon. :D

    ReplyDelete
  6. I feel sorry, we love tilapia next to galungong. Thanks for sharing.

    By the way, followed you via GFC.

    Rosels' Mom
    http://roselsmomdiary.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  7. thanks for this article, we always cook this at home specially the tilapia fillets :(

    ReplyDelete
  8. Anonymous6:42 AM

    Meron na bang proven studies or research about how bad the tilapia ??matagal na yang mga farm raised tilapia na yan bat now lng yan lumabas? Sana gumawa nmn ng proper research for the people to be aware. Haayyyy ano nlng kainin ko nito ; (

    ReplyDelete

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